Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of the New York Times bestseller Between the World and Me (Random House, 2015), National Book Award nonfiction nominee, and McArthur Grant Fellow spoke at the Cramton Auditorium at Howard University in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, October 7.

Special thanks to Januwa Moja.

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Yellow Fever: a short film by Ng’endo Mukii

I am interested in the concept of skin and race, and what they imply; in the ideas and theories sown into our flesh that change with the arc of time. The idea of beauty has become globalised, creating homogenous aspirations, and distorting people’s self-image across the planet. In my film, I focus on African women’s self-image, through memories and interviews; using mixed media to describe this almost schizophrenic self-visualization that I and many others have grown up with —Ng’endo Mukii

Yellow Fever: FULL from Ng’endo Mukii on Vimeo.

-Best Experimental Short Film, Black Star Film Festival, USA August 2014
-Best Short Film, AfriKamera Film Festival, Warsaw, Poland April 2014
-3rd place in the Documentary Category, 2nd Afrinolly Short Film Competition, February 2014
-Best Animation, This Is England Film Festival, Rouen, France November 2013
-Best Student Film, Underexposed Film Festival, SC, USA November 2013
-Silver Hugo for Best Animated Short, 49th Chicago International Film Festival, USA October 2013
-Special Mention, 59th Oberhausen International Short Film Festival, Germany May 2013
-Best Short Film, Africa Magic Viewers’ Choice Awards, Lagos, Nigeria March 2013
-Best Animation, 7th Kenya International Film Festival, Nairobi, Kenya November 2012

The invisible sounds [Los sonidos invisibles] in Colombia

The Invisible Sounds [Los Sonidos invisibles] is a documentary by anthropologists Ana María Arango and Gregor Vanerian that focuses in the San Pacho festival as an epicenter of music culture in Colombia.

 

For more information on the film and its background, check out his article posted by Africa is a Country.

Let’s Talk About Race (in Latin@ Communities)

Bring up racism amongst those from Latin America and you’ll often get an exasperated groan, followed by something about how class is the predominate stratifying principle in Latin America, and a plea to stop applying your U.S.-based take on race to those in Latin America and the Caribbean. They may even throw in a “we’re all mixed” or “what is race?” rejoinder for good measure.

They will likely bring up the fluidity of racial boundaries as a way of suggesting that the struggles around this form of discrimination have their own set of particularities when in a different setting like Latin America, and that these particularities absolve them from dealing with contradictory experiences of Afro-Latin@s that reveal a peculiarly hidden racism.

Read the rest Melissa M. Valle’s illuminating article here on nacla’s website.

 

Racecraft: Barbara Fields & Ta-Nehisi Coates in Conversation

Barbara Fields, professor of history at Columbia University, discusses her new book Racecraft—and the persistent illusions of a post-racial America—with the Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates. As Barack Obama begins his second term, the notion that we’re enjoying a “post-racial” age has gained traction. But what do we mean when we invoke that phrase? “Whatever the ‘post’ may mean in ‘post-racial,'” writes Fields in her fierce new book Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life, “it cannot mean that racism belongs to the past.” A former MacArthur Fellow and the first African American woman to receive tenure at Columbia, Fields specializes in the history of the American south and 19th-century social history. Ta-Nehisi Coates is a senior editor and blogger at the Atlantic, where he writes on culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, and his writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, and Time, among many other publications.

 

 

Dangerous Bodies

Rhon Manigault-Bryant is an assistant professor of Africana studies at Williams College. She is a scholar-artist who merges her life as a musician and vocalist with her interdisciplinary specializations in religion, gender, race, music, popular culture, and ethnographic methods. Her book Talking to the Dead: Religion, Music, and Lived Memory among Gullah/Geechee Women will soon be published by Duke University Press, and she is now at work on a book about how film and contemporary media influence mass interpretations of the black female body. Her creative endeavors have earned grants from the Ford Foundation and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. At Williams she teaches courses on research methods and ethnographic approaches to Africana studies, race and gender, and womanist/black feminist thought. She received an A.B. from Duke University, and an M.Div. and Ph.D. from Emory University.

Special thanks to Kidada Williams and Jessica Marie Johnson over at African Diaspora Ph.D for posting this vid.