Ocean Atlas

The breathtaking underwater sculpture seen below is also an artificial reef. The work was created by artist Jason deCaires Taylor, who received a commission for the project from the Bahamas Reef Environment Education Foundation.

Named “Ocean Atlas,” after the Titan in Greek Mythology, the 60 ton sculpture depicts a Bahamian girl (a local schoolgirl named Camilla served as the model for the piece), in a serene pose seated on the ocean floor and gazing blissfully over her shoulder.

Created with a high-density, pH-neutral marine cement chosen for its durability, the sculpture was installed in early October off the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas.

Underwater sculpture 1

 

Underwater 2

For more information about this incredible work, see this article in Forbes.

Jason deCaires Taylor installed his first major underwater work, Viccisitudes, off the coast of Grenada. Click here to see a slide show of that remarkable installation.

 

Rumberos (Documental sobre Rumba Cubana)

This documentary on the Rumba, shot in Havana, Cuba, is in Spanish. In addition to discussing the history of the Rumba, the film provides examples of the three main rhythms that comprise the Rumba family: Yambu, Guaguancó, and Columbia.

The documentary features a few scenes shot during the weekly (Sunday) Rumbas in Callejon de Hamel, one of my favorite spots in Havana.

 

Call and Responses: The Odyssey of the Moor

Historian MIranda Kaufmann interviews artist Graeme Evelyn about his art installation at Kensington Palace,London, featuring John van Nost’s Bust of the Moor. The lavish sculpture was commissioned by King William III in 1689.

For more information about the history surrounding this installation check out Graeme Evelyn’s website.

The Un-Private Collection: Kara Walker and Ava DuVernay

Provocative artist Kara Walker will be in conversation with Ava DuVernay, filmmaker and winner of the 2012 Sundance Best Director Award. Two of the most celebrated artists working today, both use narratives drawn from real life experiences to tell important stories from the perspective of African-American women. The recent success of Kara Walker’s Sugar Baby installation at the Domino Sugar factory in Brooklyn and Ava DuVernay’s much anticipated film Selma are bringing difficult yet vital American histories to a wide-ranging public. This dialogue will be an opportunity to hear insights on their art making across the disciplines of visual art and filmmaking.

Let’s Talk About Race (in Latin@ Communities)

Bring up racism amongst those from Latin America and you’ll often get an exasperated groan, followed by something about how class is the predominate stratifying principle in Latin America, and a plea to stop applying your U.S.-based take on race to those in Latin America and the Caribbean. They may even throw in a “we’re all mixed” or “what is race?” rejoinder for good measure.

They will likely bring up the fluidity of racial boundaries as a way of suggesting that the struggles around this form of discrimination have their own set of particularities when in a different setting like Latin America, and that these particularities absolve them from dealing with contradictory experiences of Afro-Latin@s that reveal a peculiarly hidden racism.

Read the rest Melissa M. Valle’s illuminating article here on nacla’s website.

 

Januwa Havana 2014

Januwa Havana says it all …

Movement … color … music from other worlds … ancient future designs … wearable art … In Casa de Africa  … it’s the Afrofuture, baby  … the models don’t walk the runway … they travel it from planet to planet …

This show is Cosmilicious!

This Tribute to Sun Ra took place in Casa de Africa in Havana, Cuba on July 31st, 2014.

 

See also these still photos from the show shot by Elio Delgado Valdes.